ROY LICHTENSTEIN (1923 1997)

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The Oval Office
ROY LICHTENSTEIN (1923 1997)
The Oval Office, 1992
75.4 x 99.7 cm (30 x 39 in)
Edition: 175, 25 AP, 8 PP, 12 Exhibition Proofs
Materials: Screenprint on Rives roll paper
Markings: Signed 'rf Lichtenstein '92' and numbered in pencil lower right, blind stamp lower right
Printer: Brand X Editions, New York
Publisher: The artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York, for the benefit of the Democratic National Committee
Catalogue: Corlett 277

Additional Notes:

Sheet: 90.5 x 115.4 cm (35 5/8 x 45 7/16 inches)

This print was executed for the Artists for Freedom project: prints and multiples created to benefit the Democratic National Committee, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, Citizen Vote, and selected candidates (1992 election).  Artists who contributed work to this project were Ida Applebroog, Jennifer Bartlett, Jim Dine, Jimmie Durham, Leon Golub, Red Grooms, Jenny Holzer, Roy Lichtenstein, Joan Mitchell, Elizabeth Murray, Edwin Schlossberg, Julian Schnabel, Cindy Sherman, Nancy Spero, Carrie Mae Weems, and William Wegman.

The image was also produced as a poster (see Corlett III.40), and it was reproduced on a campaign pin, which the artist suggested be an oval shape.  In addition, approximately one hundred decals, measuring 8 1/2 x 11 (21.6 x 27.9 cm) and featuring the image as it appeared on the pin, were made for a fundraising event in New York and given to supporters of Robert Abrams, the New York Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate.  The decals were signed by Lichtenstein.  A small, almost-square (7/8 x 3/4 inch (2.2 x 1.9 cm)) Election Day Pin was issued by the Democratic National Committee to celebrate the 1992 election of President Bill Clinton.  Approximately 3,000 to 5,000 in number, these pins were given to people with Clinton in Little Rock, Arkansas, on election eve in November 1992 (Ronald Feldman, letter to Corlett, February 26, 1998; and Peggy Kaplan, Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., letter to Corlett April 14, 1999).

A similar unauthorized campaign button was produced.  Of the approximately 5,000 such buttons made, about 3,500 were confiscated and remain in the archives of the Estate of Roy Lichtenstein, New York.

Lichtenstein's painting The Oval Office was completed in January 1993, after the print and poster were released.  For both the print and the painting, Lichtenstein researched the interior of the Oval Office in the White House, Washington, D.C., incorporating some authentic decorative details, including paintings that had once hung there.